List Of Us Executive Agreements

In 1904 and 1905, Secretary of State John Hay negotiated a series of treaties that provide for the general arbitration of international disputes. Article II of the Treaty with Great Britain, for example, provided that “in each particular case, the High Contracting Parties enter into a special agreement before being called before the Permanent Court of Arbitration, clearly specifying the issue and the extent of the powers of arbitrators and setting the deadlines for the formation of the arbitration tribunal and the various stages of the proceedings.” 460 The Senate approved the British treaty by a constitutional majority, having first amended it by “agreement” by imposing the word “treaty.” President Theodore Roosevelt, who called “ratification” a rejection, sent the treaties to the archives. “In historical practice,” said Dr. McClure, “the compromise in which disputes have been settled includes both contracts and executive agreements in good numbers,”461 a statement supported by Willoughby and Moore.462 The significant extension of presidential power in this area was highlighted first in President McKinley`s government. At the beginning of the war with Spain, the President announced that the United States would be bound by the last three principles of the Paris Declaration for the duration, a course that, as Professor Wright points out, “would undoubtedly go a long way to defining these three principles as an international law, mandatory for the United States in future wars.” 473 Hostilities with Spain ended in August 1898 with a ceasefire, the terms of which largely determine the subsequent peace treaty,474, as well as the ceasefire of 11 November 1918, largely determine the conditions for final peace with Germany in 1918. It was also President McKinley who, in 1900, relied solely on his sole authority as commander-in-chief, brought a 5,000-strong ground force and a naval force to work with similar contingents of other powers to save the beijing legations from boxers; A year later, without consulting Congress or the Senate, he accepted for the United States the protocol for compensation for boxers between China and the intermediate powers.475 Commenting on the Beijing Protocol, Willoughby quotes with his consent the following remark: “This case is interesting because it shows how the force of circumstances has forced us to adopt European practice in reference to an international agreement. which, with the exception of the issue of compensation, was almost exclusively political in nature . . . . Purely political treaties are usually concluded in Europe only by the executive, within the framework of constitutional practice. However, the situation in China largely justified President McKinley`s failure to submit the minutes to the Senate.